"Right guys! I have this idea. We need to go to the moon." You can bet that this idea needed some selling. The benefit was getting there before the Russians and staying on top. So what was the problem?

“Right guys! I have this idea. We need to go to the moon.”
You can bet that this idea needed some selling. The benefit was getting there before the Russians and staying on top. So what was the problem?

This is the critically important point that needs to be emphasised as part of your introduction.
How does your product, idea or proposal benefit the listeners?

Everybody who stands up in front of an audience to speak is really selling something – be it a product, an idea, a process – even just information. When I give a presentation about, for example, using emails more effectively, to an auditorium full of busy business people, many of whom perhaps were invited to attend (rather than signing up by choice), I’d better not waste their time.

Right up front I need to clarify what the problem is and how this problem is making their lives more difficult. I need to get them to relate to the problem and to realise that they are, in fact, suffering because of it. I then need to swiftly point out that I have a solution, and this solution is going to improve their lives. This involves me actually believing in what I am saying. It involves me actually getting excited about what I am saying. It is going to involve using strong positive adjectives and superlatives. I have to grab my audience’s attention by telling them what a huge benefit my ideas will be to them. Otherwise, they have no good reason to listen, or care.

This is a short extract from my ebook “How to Create and Deliver a Great Presentation“.